Responding to Criticisms about Merger vs. Schism

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Merger vs. Schism

Hi Jeremy,
i am new to the party! I have only been following the UMC discussion since this website went up during the conference. I thought your article was very well thought out and laid out. However, when you wrote "I believe that we are reflecting our culture now..." that is probably the problem. I don't believe it is ever a good idea for the church--any church or denomination, to let the world influence its message or medium. i live in Washington state and the majority just legalized recreational marijuana, i don't think anyone has thought of it yet, but i am sure that some churches will have to not only have a prayer room, but now a smoking room as well. I do believe that the "gay issue" will probably not be solved on a macro scale with church doctrine, it is too easy in the West right now, for any church from any denomination to "do their own thing" so schism is really not needed at all. I also wonder about the "domino' effect, how can the UMC say it is ok to have openly LGBT clergy but then discipline, suspend or fire heterosexual pastors having affairs, or straight pastors just living with a women? and marriage for LGBT will not solve it, let's me honest, not all LGBT clergy are going to get married or be in a "long term covenant" relationship. Just my 2 cents worth thanks!

Dave more than 2 years ago

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