What Is United Methodism?

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What is United Methodism?

I believe Brother Meunier hit the nail on the head with his list of descriptors of the UMC. I would have ordered the list differently, and topped it with "Middle to upper-middle class sensibilities and norms." We are an institution living within a nation of institutions, all of which operate within their own cultural milieu. We are a very middle-class institution, one which sees some religious practices (like conversions down the sawdust trail) as being declasse'.

We prefer to have Christians who have grown up in Christian homes, and for whom expressions of the Christian faith are not strewn with excessive exuberance or emotionalism. We would rather get new members who either long ago made their conversion (believing there is no one as offensive as the newly converted Christian) or who grew up in homes knowing no other Lord but Christ, and taking it for granted.

Even though we found our growth in the nineteenth century in going to where the people were and founding churches in every community we could, in truth, the home missionaries we sent out were not there to create new Christians by conversion, but by being a church to the settled folks. (Even John Wesley learned that when he came as a missionary to Georgia hoping to convert the Indians but finding that his church really only wanted him to be a chaplain to the Anglo immigrants.)

We are a church which likely is the last, relatively unadulterated remnant of an institution steeped in the political modality political scientists call "Jacksonian Democracy." This is a radical form of democracy where anyone who moves to a higher level, or represents a group, is elected by the group next lower in our polity. Every minister in the UMC was *elected* as a candidate by the Charge Conference of the Church in which his/her professing membership was held, and was affirmed by the District Conference in which his/her local church had its existence, before s/he could ever go for review by the Board of Ordained Ministry of the Annual Conference in which s/he sought membership. Our churches *elect* lay members to Annual Conferences, and *elect* lay and clergy delegates to the General and Jurisdictional Conferences. This is our organizational and polity DNA. The only recent and amazing thing about this, to me, was the shock and surprise that the Judicial Council undid the action of the General Conference seeking to re-organize the denomination. This action was as predictable as the tides and the phases of the moon!

We've made it work for years. Now, we need to learn how to make our church work in an era where the growing social divide is between the upper classes and the working class--our "market," the middle class, is shrinking. It can be done, if we can accept this, our corporate culture, and learn to live within it.

Tom Griffith more than 2 years ago

Notable Quotes

“Someone should have told the young man (alleged shooter Dylann Roof), [that if] he wanted to start a race war, ... he came to the wrong place.”
– African Methodist Episcopal Bishop John Richard Bryant at the funeral of the Rev. Clementa Pinckney, pastor of Emanuel AME Church in Charleston, SC, and one of the nine shooting victims.


"I read scripture theologically. But as a New Testament scholar, I see my job as always listening first and foremost to the text in its historical context, and allowing its theology to be the first voice to which we respond. In the end, I will affirm creeds or confessions, if I do, because I believe they contain the right things to say at a given moment in time in which they were written, in light of what scriptures says."
– J. R. Daniel Kirk, a professor at Fuller Theological Seminary who was denied tenure after participating in a panel on how to respond to the U.S. Supreme Court's decision on marriage equality. From his blog Storied Theology.


"War, retaliation and retribution are not the answer. The only thing that will conquer hate is our deciding to love. Such is the imperative of discipleship to love. Love that is unconditional. Situations may result in catastrophe. Circumstances may seemingly justify condemnation, but that’s not what Christians are allowed to do. We are not allowed to counter-punch. We are required to love in the face of pain, prejudice and persecution, doing so unconditionally."
– The Rev. F. Willis Johnson, pastor of Wellspring United Methodist Church in Ferguson, Mo., in an essay on the Charleston massacre for Ministry Matters.