Preparing for Nothing (or Anything) from General Conference

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Nothing

The sole purpose of GC 2019 is to make a decision over one thing. To do nothing is to admit failure and The UMC as we know it will be on a spiral path toward chaos. Is he trying to prepare us for the possibility of failure?

Kevin 12 days ago

Nothing no longer acceptable

I agree with the author's point that the UMC has traditionally tied to resolve sticky and divisive issues by kicking the can down the road, but I have to question whether that course of inaction is viable at this point. The theological issues which divide us have never been so pronounced or publicized as they are at this point. To do nothing or to refer to another expensive committee would be the height of cynicism. Those that care, both Progressives and Traditionalists, would start leaving in greater numbers as it becomes more and more apparent the denominational institution is incapable of governing itself. If my local church holds its pledge drive this Fall, I intend to withhold making a pledge until the results in February are clear. I will either escrow the monthly amount I would normally pledge or pay those funds into a particular church account so that the full amount remains totally with my local congregation with none going towards any apportionments. The results in February will determine whether I resign my membership from the UMC denomination. I really don't think I will be the only one making this decision. Very sad we can't amicable divide into two Wesleyan denominations so we can concentrate on worship, spiritual growth and missions.

John 13 days ago

I Agree with You Completely

Changing the Bible no longer makes the UM church a bible based church. I will be worshipping and tithing in a Bible based church. The results in February will also determine whether I resign my membership as well, even though I have been born and raised in the UM denomination (for 67 years).

Alice 2 days ago


Notable Quotes   


   Jonathan Wilson-Hartgrove "When Jesus said, 'I have come that they might have life, and have it more abundantly' in John 10:10, he wasn’t thinking about a victory for those who have used religion to fight back against the gains of the civil rights movement. Jesus was inviting all of us to work together for the vision at the heart of that movement — a beloved community where all people created in God’s image can thrive."

– Jonathan Wilson-Hartgrove, writing in "The Evangelical Case Against Judge Kavanaugh" in the Sept. 3 New York Times.

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