Why Splitting the UMC Is a Bad Idea




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UMC's Future

The attraction of progressives to religious denominations grew predominantly as a political soution or a means to an end to counter what the left believed was one of the major impediments to their agenda. Many of the progressives either did not truly embrace the spiritual element of Christianity or simply convinced themselves that their view were and are aligned with the true teachings of Christ. Nonetheless, religious denominations were seen as the means to mainstream their agenda in the United States. Of course, something happened along the way to the total conversion (through ministerial and leadership positions) that they expected, and that is, their agenda was not being accepted by congregations. As the progressives grow more secular in orientation and support they ultimately lose the basis for the church's existence only to be supplanted by the all powerful state. In essence, if the state supplies the needs of the people why do the people need religion and faith. Of course, progressives either refuse to acknowledge this or are incapable of grasping the destructive fruits of their agenda. The UM will regain it's secure footing with congregations and experience a rejuvination if these elements ultimately leave the church.

David more than 1 year ago

conspiracy Theory Talking Points Don't Help

Your bearing of false witness against others here based upon right-wing memes is reprehensible. Seldom have I see such an ignorant, smug, as wasteful post anywhere. Your assertions merely show the weakness of your position in the face of the steamrolling of history.

Actually the other Mainline denominations which have rejected hatred against their LGBT brothers and sisters are doing quite well, thank you. That we fight within the UMC against extremist elements when we have so many other options merely illustrates our commitment to doing what is right. Progressives tend to possess verve and elan and are not cowed by your sneering lugubrious missive. We ain't leaving. We'll win just like the good side that won the Civil War.

George Nixon Shuler more than 1 year ago

Loving one another

Well, OK, I am willing to seek to love those who currently despise me in the hope of contact and working together.
However. At our 2011 Annual conference when we had hoped to have some real discussion of the Resolutions made available by the RMN and local progressives, people, we were confronted byt a Rule of Order that we /COULD NOT discuss any matters directed to the General Conference, implying that they would not have any local implications.
It was, of course, directed to the RMN resolutions but also caught up Israel-Palestine and Immigration materials in its net. What was the intent of Conferences, anyway? Just to mindlessly vote on insurance and ordain a few people and over-eat fat-heavy food and go home?
If we are not allowed to confer, to discuss, to work on our differences, then how can we solve the problems, how can we remain one church. I would not advise anyone to join the UMC right now, although I warmly welcome those who wander in and hope they will stay in My Congregation which mostly does not think at all of the larger church, nor care what it does.

Anne Ewing more than 2 years ago

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