Healing the Moral Wounds of War

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Moral Injury

I get ready to move to what is very likely my final assignment in the Army. I will become the Command Chaplain for the Southern Region Medical Command. From Jun 08 to Jul 11 I served as the Command Chaplain for the Medical Command in the Army. I've also been to war three times and during my Jan 04 to Feb 05 deployment to Iraq saw more of the rawness of war than I cared to. Moral Injury is the right and proper way to define it. I've gotten help and I continue to be a "work in progress". I continue to recover and view my journey as growth. I am excited about working with a smaller number of clinically trained chaplains and hope to collaborate with them to shape some meaningful, evidenced based care that will assist recovery, particularly for our wounded, ill and injured in our warrior transition units. I look forward to working with medical staffs and support staffs to provide the best science and art we can.

CH (COL) John Read more than 4 years ago

relevance

Cynthia, the journey continues. Ten years ago you joined the United Methodist Endorsing Agency in Nashville, Tenn. as we took the needs of chaplains returning from deployment seriously. Your work and others has changed lives. The ministry continues and I am deeply grateful that the UMCom has a landing page www.umc.org/military where resources are continuously being sought, added, and developed to inform and engage people and congregations to support our service members now, those who have served, and to prepare for those who will serve. Thank you for your continuous support.

laura flippen more than 4 years ago

Notable Quotes


"Harsh and direct disagreement places thought under pressure. That’s its point. Pressure can be intellectually productive: being forced to look closely at arguments against a beloved position helps those who hold it to burnish and buttress it as often as it moves them to abandon it. But pressure also causes pain and fear; and when those under pressure find these things difficult to bear, they’ll sometimes use any means possible to make the pressure and the pain go away. They feel unsafe, threatened, put upon, and so they react by deploying the soft violence of the law or the harder violence of the aggressive and speech-denying protest. Both moves are common enough in our élite universities now, as is their support by the powers that be. Tolerance for intellectual pain is less than it was. So is tolerance for argument."

– Paul Griffiths, former professor of Catholic theology at United Methodist-related Duke University Divinity School, in an article for Commonweal magazine on why he resigned over a recent conflict with a colleague related to racism training.


   

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