The UMC: Matted Hair and Wrinkled Ladies

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Apologies

For us to move forward together, it just seems like the Western Jurisdiction will have to come up with some apologies as well. They ran out of patience. And that was the trigger for the split.

They felt what they did was needed. I don't think they will apologize. We need to all move forward as best we can, but that likely will not be in the same relationship as it was in the past. It's probably a good thing.

This article was written by the retired pastor to try to make herself feel better versus actually trying to get the parties to reconcile.

Anonymous 103 days ago

Split Due to Lack of Patience?

Wait. I am 59 years old. An LGBT Methodist from 1960, I have spent my entire life waiting for the UMC to treat me like a human being.

How does this make me impatient? How does this make me, and other Methodists like me, responsible for the division in the UMC?

Have I not waited long enough?

Ben 98 days ago

I am a lifelong UMC laity

My do or die issue with the church is not sexuality but rather my extreme frustration at spending way too much of my life thinking that if I did church enough, one day I would be able to make sense of the jumble of theological generalities rumbling around in my head. I now know that is completely impossible because the denomination is drowning in theological plurality, incapable of teaching anybody anything specific about anything. Turns out, that for decades everybody has been making up Methodism as they go along. I have read Wesley's sermons; his priority #1 was never ever social justice initiatives. It was to create a space for God to heal broken people and enable them to live a fruitful and abundant life that went much deeper than supporting somebody's "cause". And if you doubt what I am saying chase down a copy of E. Stanley Jones' book "Abundant Living" and read it cover to cover. He details how the Methodist Church of the 1940's had already drifted from connecting individuals to God in a robust and positive way.


Don't get me wrong, I am not against social justice initiatives--they are greatly needed. But when a church becomes so enmeshed in social justice initiatives that individuals are left floundering in a morass of confusion, then something desperately needs to give--especially if that church claims to have a Methodist/Wesleyan heritage! Don't get me wrong, I am not against social justice initiatives--they are greatly needed. But when a church becomes so enmeshed in social justice initiatives that individuals are left floundering and confused, unsure about themselves and God, then something desperately needs to give--especially if that church claims to have a Methodist/Wesleyan heritage! Therefore, I am extremely delighted in the work of the IRD because "...they have spearheaded a movement to destroy the core of United Methodism and its long-standing work on the part of social justice." The core of Methodism is the individual and their life with God. Early Methodism transformed England and America one person at a time. We have been untethered from our theological roots for so long many in the American UMC do not have a clue what Methodism is really about and have not had one for a very long time.

betsy 103 days ago

I'm not

...but the IRD has decided to break the UMC.

Some change might have been necessary - perhaps the 'social justice' argument has processed too far from the core tenets (I don't think so, but I can acknowledge that there might be an argument to be had there).

Fundamentalism isn't the answer (and rest assured, for all the negativity that word gets these days, the IRD and WCA and Good News etc advocate a solid fundamentalist Christian worldview). And Fundamentalism isn't really Methodist - if that were to be the case, there would be no reason, no experience necessary in any Methodist worldview.

My favorite Wesley quote:
"The Methodists alone do not insist on your holding this or that opinion; but they think and let think. Neither do they impose any particular mode of worship; but you may continue to worship in your former manner, be it what it may. Now I do not know of any other religious society, either ancient or modern, wherein such liberty of conscience is now allowed or has been allowed, since the age of the Apostles."

Note: that's about as far from Christian fundamentalism as you can get.

JR 103 days ago

Wesley claimed to be

a "Man of one Book" - the Bible. Experience and reason are on a far lower level for Methodists. "Think and let think" applied to things like Calvanish (if you must) - never to basic Christian beliefs like morality.

Skipper 96 days ago

Betsy

You bring out an important point about John Wesley – that he was about healing broken people and bringing them to God. A holy God has every right to want a holy people! Wesley wanted Methodists to be as holy as possible – so moral living was certainly expected. “Making your own Methodism” was never on the table and moves people away from God.

Skipper 96 days ago

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